Old Sacramento

Sacramento – The oldest part of the town besides Sutter’s Fort is Old Sacramento, which consists of cobbled streets and many historic buildings, several from the 1850s and 1860s. Sacramento buildings have been preserved, restored or reconstructed, and the district is now a substantial tourist attraction, with rides on steam-hauled historic trains and paddle steamers.

The historic buildings include the Lady Adams Building, built by the passengers and ship’s carpenters of the ship Lady Adams.[57] Having survived the Great Conflagration of November 1852, it is the oldest surviving building in Sacramento other than Sutter’s Fort.[57]
Reconstruction of California’s first permanent theatre, the Eagle Theatre (Sacramento, California)
Another surviving Sacramento landmark is the B.F. Hastings building, built in 1853. Early home of the California Supreme Court and the location of the office of Theodore Judah, it also was the western terminus of the Pony Express.[58]

The “Big Four Building”, built in 1852, was home to the offices of Collis Huntington, Mark Hopkins, Leland Stanford, and Charles Crocker. The Central Pacific Railroad and Southern Pacific Railroad were founded there. The original building was destroyed in 1963 for the construction of Interstate 5, but was re-created using original elements in 1965. It is now a National Historic Landmark. Also of historic interest is the Eagle Theatre (Sacramento, California), a reconstruction of California’s first permanent theatre in its original location.